Category Archives: Mobile Apps

My Account Was Hacked – Here’s How to Control the Damages

In your digital life, it’s quite possible that you may experience a cyber attack. Many of us have had this experience, either in mild forms (adware, browser hijackers) on in more impactful ways (banking Trojans, ransomware, etc.).

Given the frequency in data breaches, your private data could also become involved in such a breach, independently of your actions

So it’s important to have an action plan for when this happens, a plan that can guide your steps and help you manage the panic.

We actually created a guide for that particular situation, which I honestly hope you’ll never experience. It includes advice on how to behave, how to act and what to verify to ensure that your risks are minimized.

I hope you find it useful!

1. First of all, this is not a good time to panic. Take a deep breath and keep your calm.

The opposite, not caring, nor taking any measures, isn’t an option either.

You should be aware that things could quickly escalate in an unwanted direction. It doesn’t matter if you think the service is unimportant to you.

The breached data can be used to hack into other accounts of yours (especially if you use the same password for multiple accounts – please don’t), identity theft, financial damage, blackmailing and cause all sorts of other unwanted headaches.

2. Log into the account of the service that was hacked as soon as you find out about the breach.

Glance over the settings for your account, see if there’s anything fishy or changed there.

If you can’t access your account anymore, reset the password via email.

If you used a fake email for it, or you don’t have access to that email account anymore, you’ll have to contact the administrators of that website and prove it’s your account.

Keep out

3. Change the password for that service. Use a strong, unique password.

If you’ve been reading our blog constantly, you most likely know how much we insist on this issue: never, ever reuse a password. You should have unique, strong passwords, that you change periodically.

However, if it’s too late for this and you recycled the password from the compromised website, change the password for all other services.

You can use a password generator, such as Norton Identity Safe Password Generator, in order to create strong passwords.

In the future, prepare for the worse and make sure you don’t reuse the passwords, in order to minimize the impact in case of a hacked account. You wouldn’t use the same key for your house and for you car, would you?

Remember to treat the answers to the password security questions the same as you treat your password. Don’t use real answers, instead generate strong passwords. The real answers can be easily discovered by attackers.

And never keep your passwords in a file on your computer, mail or cloud. Instead, you can use a passwords management application, like LastPass or Dashlane. This way, you won’t have to memorize 30-40 strong passwords, with all their capital letters and symbols and numbers, passwords that you regularly change. You’ll only have to remember the master password for your LastPass account, your other passwords will be safely encrypted.

Combination_lock

4. If available, activate two-factor (or more) authentication.

The two-factor authentication (or two-steps verification) will add an extra layer of security, using your mobile phone. It works as a secondary authentication method, besides your password.

It will send you a one-time, unique digit code by SMS or generated by an authentication app installed on your phone.

Gmail, Twitter, Facebook and Amazon are among the ones who offer this option. You can find an extended list on TwoFactorAuth.org.

How your online accounts are interconnected

5. Change the password to your email or any other linked accounts.

As soon as you find out about the breach, change the password for the email you used to create the account for the service that got hacked.

Also look over the email settings, especially the Email Forwarding, Filters, Reply-to Address and Security Questions, to make sure that everything’s in order. An attacker will try to leave some kind of a back door opened, to come back into the account.

Your email address is most likely tied to many of your online accounts. If any of those is compromised, you’ll have to change the password to any other service that was remotely linked.

Also de-authorize all the third-party apps, that use your account.

Source/Reference

Top Ten Cyber Security Predictions

1. The Internet of Things

The First Major Attack on IoT Devices​ 2016 was the breakout year for attacks on IoT devices. In October, the first massive cyber attack involving IoT devices, such as​ ​webcams and DVRs, occurred. The ​Mirai Botnet was unleashed, and it took down half the Internet in the United States ​for hours. Using what is called a Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack, cybercriminals flooded one of the largest server companies in the world with massive amounts of traffic, bringing down the servers and websites hosted on them. It was discovered that tens of millions of computers were sending data to targeted websites, simultaneously. Shortly after the U.S. attack, the same botnet attacked Germany, disrupting services for over 900,000 Internet subscribers.

​This particular strain of malware is not going away anytime soon. The malware itself is believed to be widely distributed on the black market, and hackers are offering established botnet armies for hire. The big surprise for users involved in this attack was realizing that connected devices have default usernames and passwords.

Because of this fact, the attackers targeted certain devices that for which they had obtained the default usernames and passwords.This threat is likely to continue given the increasing popularity of connected devices, but there are ways you can protect yourself. IoT devices, no matter how small they seem, are computers too! Do some research on your device to see if it has a default password. If it does, the manufacturer’s website should have instructions on how to change it.

A new security solution for IoT vulnerabilities​

Over the past year, here at Norton, we’ve been keeping a close eye on the Internet of things threat landscape. As a result, we’re proud to announce the brand new Norton Core router.

Unlike conventional routers, Norton Core was built to secure and protect connected homes. To provide strong wireless coverage, Norton Core has a unique antenna array inside a geodesic dome of interlocking faces, inspired by defense and weather radars deployed in the extreme reaches of the globe. Norton Core’s unique mathematical design encourages users to place it out in the open, as part of their home décor, providing a strong, unobstructed Wi-Fi signal.

IoT Ransomware

In addition to the Mirai Botnet targeting IoT devices, we also saw a new ransomware threat that affected smart TVs. FLocker (short for “Frantic Locker”) ransomware was capable of locking up an Android-based television. This particular ransomware strain is not new, as it has been posing a threat to Android smartphones since May of 2015. However, this particular strain made the jump to smart TVs running android OS in 2016. Luckily, this variant of malware does not encrypt files on the infected television. However, it does lock the screen, preventing the user from watching TV.

The continued targeting of smart devices by cybercriminals is our top threat prediction for 2017. With all these new attacks starting to ramp up in late 2016, we can only expect to see more of attacks on these devices in 2017.

2. The Apple Threat Landscape

The Apple threat landscape was extremely busy in 2016. We reported on seven major stories in 2016. In 2015, we saw quite a few proof of concepts, but 2016 brought more threats out into the wild. These are the same threats that are affecting Windows and Android devices.

Fake Apps Do Exist for iPhones

Cybercriminals sneaked fake shopping apps into the app store right before the holiday season. While Apple has a rigorous vetting process for their apps, these scammers got tricky and updated the apps with malware after Apple approved them for the App Store.

Spyware Is Everywhere

In addition to fake apps, 2016 saw the first targeted spyware released in the wild for iOS. Researchers discovered that a highly sophisticated cyber espionage group deployed a very rare, advanced form of spyware, which can break an iPhone wide open. The spyware, known as Pegasus, is distributed by sending a link to a malicious website via text message. The good news: Apple has already pushed out the update to the vulnerability.

iOS Bugs Are Ramping Up

Also on the iOS platform, there were three major vulnerabilities to keep an eye on. Researchers discovered a way to break the encryption used by iMessage that could allow attackers to access and steal attachments such as images, videos and documents that are being shared securely with contacts.

The second vulnerability discovered involves the handling of PDF documents. An attacker could send you a booby-trapped PDF that would then cause malicious code to run on your iPhone.

The third involves the fix of a three-year old cookie theft bug. Cookies are small files that contain various types of data that remember a user, and are placed on your computer or mobile device by websites you visit. This flaw can allow hackers to impersonate users and steal sensitive information by creating a malicious public Wi-Fi network. The hackers then wait for a compromised user to join the network and redirect them to a malicious website designed to steal user credentials. From there, the hacker would be able to open the embedded browser screen you would see when joining a public Wi-Fi network, load content into a user’s phone and execute it without them knowing.

Mac Ransomware–It’s Happening!

In March of 2016 Apple customers were the targets of the first Mac-focused ransomware campaign executed by cybercriminals. In this instance, it was the first time that cybercriminals used malware to execute real-life attacks.

In this particular case, users were downloading a program called “Transmission for BitTorrent,” which is used for peer-to-peer file sharing. Users downloaded a “bad” version of the installer for the software, which contained a malicious Trojan horse, known as OSX.Keranger. A Trojan horse is malicious software that can wreak havoc with data in many ways–such as the deletion, modification, copying, and stealing of data–as well as implant ransomware on the device. Like most ransomware, will encrypt a user’s files and demand a fee to release them.

Not Just Macs and iPhones Anymore

2016 also brought the first major issue to Apple’s AirPort routers. Apple discovered vulnerabilities in the firmware of AirPorts that could allow attackers to execute commands on the affected devices and infiltrate home networks. If your AirPort is flashing yellow, go update your firmware now!

This just goes to show that Apple products do need security software, now more than ever. You can protect your Mac against these threats and more with Norton Security Premium.

3. Man in the Middle Attacks

2016 was also a big year for Man-in-the-Middle (MitM) attacks. An MitM attack employs the use of an unsecured or poorly secured, usually public, Wi-Fi router. The hacker scans the router using special code looking for certain weaknesses such as default or poor password use. Once a vulnerability is discovered, the attacker will then insert themself in between the users’ computer and the websites the user visits to intercept the messages being transmitted between the two.

A lot of these attacks take place on public Wi-Fi hotspots. Since most of these networks are unsecured, it’s easy pickings for cybercriminals. In addition to unsecured hotspots, hackers will also set up legitimate-looking Wi-Fi networks in order to lure unsuspecting users to connect and give them full access to their device.

Norton WiFi Privacy is a VPN that encrypts all the information sent and received by your mobile device while you’re on public Wi-Fi, making your public connection private. Download Norton WiFi Privacy now.

4. Android, Android, Android!

In 2016, we reported on six major Android events. The top three threats we saw involved fake apps, botnets, and, of course, ransomware.

Bad Apps

Hundreds of malicious applications showed up on the Google Play store in October, disguised as legitimate applications. These malicious apps were carrying malware known as Dresscode. Dresscode is designed to infiltrate networks and steal data. It can also add infected devices to botnets, which carry out denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks as well as take part in spam email campaigns.

Android Botnets

Android smartphone users should be aware of a dangerous new type of malware that spreads via spam SMS or MMS messages.  The Mazar BOT, as it is called, tricks the Android user into providing administrative access to the infected Android phone and can then erase any stored data. Although security research experts believe this malware has several hidden capabilities that are still being discovered, they know this malware will turn your smartphone into part of a hacker botnet web.

Mobile Ransomware

In 2016 there was a lot of mobile ransomware rampant on the threat landscape. Most notably, there were two that left devices completely vulnerable.

One variant of Android ransomware uses what is called “clickjacking” tactics to try and trick users into giving the malware device administrator rights. Clickjacking occurs when attackers conceal hyperlinks beneath legitimate content, tricking the user into performing actions of which they are unaware. Users stumble upon these illegitimate links, assuming that when they fill out a field, click on a link, or type in their passwords they’re gaining access to what they see in front of them.

Android.Lockdroid was spotted on March 11, 2016, and disguised itself as a system update. What’s different about this particular strain is that once the ransomware detects that it’s installed on a device in a certain country, it displays the ransom message in that country’s language. This is the first type of “chameleon” ransomware we’ve spotted. In general, Android.Lockdroid needs to be manually downloaded by the user from adult sites to infect devices. It could also automatically arrive on the device when the user clicks on advertising links, which is known as malvertising, a form of malicious advertising.

Taking advantage of quality security software such as Norton Mobile Security, (link is external) is an important measure that protects your device from malicious apps. With Norton Mobile Security, you can use our app advisor to scan for “bad apps” before downloading them to your phone. Norton App Advisor is a special feature included with Norton Mobile Security. It warns of privacy risks, intrusive behavior of apps, excessive battery drainage and data plan usage. It also features call and SMS blocking, anti-theft, contacts backup and protects your mobile phone from malware.

5. Malicious Sites, Drive-by-Downloads and Malvertising

Malvertising is a combined term for malicious advertising, and uses legitimate online advertising services to spread malware. Malvertising requires placing malware-infected advertisements on regular Web pages through authentic online advertising networks in order to infect a device through the Web browser. Malvertising can affect ANY device–PC, Mac, Android, etc.

In March of 2016 several mainstream websites fell victim to a massive malvertising campaign. The tainted ads in these websites directed thousands of unsuspecting users to a landing page hosting the notorious Angler Exploit Kit, a kit that stealthily installs crypto-ransomware.

Malicious Websites and Drive-by-Downloads

A drive-by-download is a download that occurs when a user visits a malicious website that is hosting an exploit kit. There is no interaction needed on the user’s part other than visiting the infected webpage. The exploit kit will look for a vulnerability in the software of the browser and inject malware via the security hole. Symantec identified thousands of websites in 2016 that had been compromised with malicious code. Of the compromised websites, 75 percent were located in the U.S.

Defensive software such as Norton Security will prevent known drive-by downloads and warn you when you try to visit a malicious website.

If you are unsure about the credibility of a website you can also use Norton Safe Web, a free online tool, that can help identify risky websites as you browse the Web.

6. Social Media Scams

In 2016, Facebook reported that it had 1.71 billion monthly active Facebook users. Twitter has 313 million monthly active users. With so many active users, popular social sites are a scammer’s paradise. The motives are the same: scammers try to exploit these stories for any kind of financial gain possible.

Scammers will try to entice you into clicking by posting sensational or emotional breaking news stories, sometimes capitalizing on a recent news event, or making up a fake, shocking news story. When you click on the link, you get a notification that you need to download a plug-in in order to view the video. Click on it and you could be downloading spyware that will stay on your device and collect personal information that could be used for identity theft. Remember to delete emails from unknown senders and don’t download unknown plug-ins.

7. Tax Scams and Identity Theft

It’s important to realize that tax documents contain a plethora of personally identifiable information about people, such as wage information, Social Security numbers, home addresses and place of employment. Once these documents are obtained, the criminals would have everything they need to perform tax refund fraud; effectively stealing tax refunds owed to others. Because these documents contain a plethora of information, they can help the scammers commit identity fraud In addition to tax refund fraud.

Examples of phishing emails to be on the lookout for:

  • Fake IRS and TurboTax emails claiming the recipient’s tax refund is restricted or their account has been locked
  • Fake IRS-branded emails asking the recipient to update their tax filing information
  • Fake email claims saying a tax payment was deducted and includes a “receipt”
  • Fake email from the IRS seeking proof of identity documents because “You are eligible to receive a refund”
  • W2 phishing emails targeting employees

Existing Trends Coming Back for More

8. Ransomware:

Ransomware is here to stay. The first known case of ransomware popped up in 2013, and hackers have latched on to this tactic, refining it over the years. In 2016 we reported on eight major ransomware campaigns, which affected everything: Macs, Windows computers, Android platforms and more.

This year, we saw some notably new forms of ransomware, which just goes to show that cybercriminals are trying to “up their game” in extorting money from you.

The most unique form of ransomware we saw was the Jigsaw ransomware. This is not your average ransomware. Like other ransomware, Jigsaw will encrypt your files and demand a ransom in order to retrieve your files; however, it also comes with a countdown timer. During the first 24 hours it will start deleting a few files every hour. On the second day, the ransomware will delete hundreds of files, on the third day it will delete thousands–until the ransom is paid. Additionally, if you try to tamper with the ransomware or even restart your computer, it will delete 1,000 files as a “punishment.

”Whatever happens in ANY case of ransomware, do NOT pay the ransom, and be sure to keep regular backups to help protect your data in case you become a victim of ransomware.

Need backup? Norton Security Premium offers you an easy way to help defend against ransomware as well as a convenient backup solution.

9. Software Vulnerabilities and Software Updates:

Major software vulnerabilities continued to be a huge problem in 2016. Attackers heavily rely upon these vulnerabilities, as it is the easiest way to sneak malware into a user’s device unnoticed, with little action on the user’s part.

We reported on six major vulnerabilities in 2016- including an Adobe patch for 25 flaws, as well as quite a few other emergency patches from them as well.

The best way to combat against these attacks is to perform any and all software updates as soon as they are available. Software updates will patch those security holes attackers exploit, add new features and improve bug fixes.

10. 2016 Was a Banner Year for Mega Data Breaches

​Unfortunately, data breaches are almost as common as malware outbreaks. In 2016 there were eight mega-breaches involving major companies. Most recently, in December, over 1 million Google accounts were breached via malicious Android apps. This attack was particularly nasty because the only way to completely remove this malware from an infected device is to do a clean installation of the operating system. This is a complicated process, but mobile carriers can perform the installation for users.

However, topping the list for the most accounts breached was Yahoo, with a whopping total of 1.5 billion users. Yahoo announced this year that they had been the victim of two separate cyber attacks that occurred in 2014. The first breach that was announced stole information associated with 500 million accounts. The second breach, which is now the largest data breach in history, stole information from one billion accounts.

The second largest data breach of 2016 was from FriendFinder Networks Inc., which involved a breach of over 400 million accounts. 117 million LinkedIn user credentials were also snagged in 2016, and Dropbox verified that 68 million credentials were also stolen last year.

Big data is big money for attackers, so they set their sights on companies that tend to hold large amounts of personally identifiable data on their customers, such as Social Security numbers, birthdates, home addresses and even medical records. It’s easy for a cybercrime victim to report credit card fraud and just get a new number. When it comes to a Social Security number, though, you are bound to it for life. And Social Security numbers open the door to all sorts of identity theft.

Source/Reference

How to lock apps on iPhone?

Written By Subhali Mukherjee

In my previous articles, I have guided you how to lock your iPhone ( so its safe from unwanted handlers ). But what if you want to keep certain applications out of reach of foreign users. Apple gives you a way out of that too! In this post lets look in detail on How to lock apps on iPhone.

What Restrictions it does here is that if we enable it for certain apps, it tends to remove those apps completely from the app menu, i.e the user can’t see them at all. Here’s how:

Step 1 : From your Home Screen, navigate to Settings > General > Restrictions.

How to lock apps on iPhone

How to lock apps on iPhone?

How to lock apps on iPhone?

Step 2 : Tap on Enable Restrictions.

How to lock apps on iPhone?

Step 3 : You will be redirected to a screen asking you to Enter a Restrictions Passcode. Feed in your desired Passcode. ( Make sure you remember the same! ) Re-enter the Passcode to confirm.

How to lock apps on iPhone?

How to lock apps on iPhone?

Step 4 : Once done, you will be redirected back to the Restrictions screen where you will find a number of apps listed that are allowed.

How to lock apps on iPhone?

Step 5 : Slide the switch Off to remove those apps from the app menu.

In case you want to lock your Apps individually, you will have to Jailbreak your device which is not advisable unless you are absolutely desperate and have no other way. If you are ready to do that, you may download iAppLock. Its an app that locks individual apps. Rest assured, your iPhone is in safe hands. It provides features like Passcode Lock, Pattern Lock, Customize screen locks, Touch ID lock.

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Android backdoor is secretly sending user data and texts to China, and no one knows why

androidsurveillanc.jpg

By Conner Forrest

A new backdoor that was recently discovered in budget Android devices is sending user location data, text message, and call logs to a server in China every 72 hours, and no one seems to know the reason why. First reported on by the New York Times on Tuesday, the backdoor was discovered by Security firm Kryptowire.

According to the New York Times report, the backdoor comes in the form of pre-installed monitoring software that collects the above-mentioned information. The Times said that American authorities are unsure if the data is being collected for advertising purposes, or if it is and actual governmental effort at surveillance.

One of the most interesting aspects of this backdoor is that it is an intentional piece of the software on these devices. That, as noted by The Verge, makes it a feature of the device and not an exploited vulnerability.

The software was developed by a Chinese company called Shanghai Adups Technology Company, which claims the code is active on more than 700 million Android devices. According to the Times, it predominantly affects international users and those who use prepaid Android devices, but the total impact of the backdoor isn’t fully known. However, the Times did note that American Android manufacturer, BLU Products, had 120,000 of its phones affected.
According to documents provided to BLU by Shanghai Adups Technology Company, the code was originally written for another Chinese company, to help them monitor phones, the Times reported. Additionally, Shanghai Adups Technology Company’s website claims they work with smartphone manufacturers ZTE and Huawei.

However, a Huawei spokesperson said: “Huawei takes our customers’ privacy and security very seriously, and we work diligently to safeguard that privacy and security. The company mentioned in this report is not on our list of approved suppliers, and we have never conducted any form of business with them.”

Additionally, an official statement from ZTE USA read: “We confirm that no ZTE devices in the U.S. have ever had the Adups software cited in recent news reports installed on them, and will not. ZTE always makes security and privacy a top priority for our customers. We will continue to ensure customer privacy and information remain protected.”

A Google official told the New York Times that it had asked Shanghai Adups Technology Company to remove the software from devices running the Google Play Store. Also, Kryptowire has taken its findings to the US government.

The discovery comes at a turbulent time for Android, as recent malware discoveries claimed to put millions of devices at risk of dealing with fake advertising and other issues. The news also adds more fuel to the conversation around backdoors in smartphones, sparked by Apple’s battle with the FBI over privacy concerns earlier this year.

The 3 big takeaways for readers:
A backdoor on some Android devices is sending call logs, location data, and full text messages to a Chinese server, as reported by the New York Times.
The backdoor appears to be a feature and not an exploit, as the code was intentionally added to the operating system for the purpose of gathering information, the Times reported.
The discovery of this backdoor could reopen the conversation around smartphone privacy started by Apple and the FBI in early 2016.

Source

7 Best Antivirus for iPhone in 2017 to keep your phone safe


Best Antivirus For iPhone: The two major giants of smartphones, iOS and android have been fighting since long. And the most powerful argument held by the iOS users deals with security. One has to agree upon the fact that iOS does have an upper hand in terms of security. But, this doesn’t make the iOS users completely safe from the malicious attacks on their iPhones. Thus, the importance of having an antivirus for iPhone in 2017 can not be neglected. And for that matter, you gotta choose the best antivirus for iPhone in 2017 which can protect your iPhone. To make your task easy, we have made a detailed research and shortlisted the most effective and best antivirus for iPhone in 2017.

Best Antivirus for iPhone in 2017:

1.  Avast Secure-Me:

Avast is the big brand name in the arena of antivirus. The Avast Secure-Me application is focused on keeping a track on your online presence. Avast Secure-Me keeps a watch on your activities like online messaging, shopping, banking, etc. During this Avast Secure-Me makes sure that your private information stays secured and prevents any kind of leaks. The main problems are faced when you’re connected to an open WiFi network. In this case, there is a high probability that your private information gets leaked. Avast Secure-Me notifies you against any such threats.

avast antivirus for iphone in 2016

2. McAfee Mobile Security

Sometimes you don’t need the internet to lose. Any of your important file on your iPhone can be easily accessed by anyone in your near proximity. McAfee Mobile Security helps you keep you friends away form snooping your private stuffs. It provides you with a shield to protect your confidential files and even report you if anyone else apart from you tries to access them. Along with this, it also facilitates backing up your iPhone’s data so that you retrieve it according to the need. One amazing feature is Secure Snap, which stores all the images being captured directly into your secured vault.

Mcafee antivirus for iphone

3. Lookout Mobile Security:

Something which might turn out to be a nightmare for every iPhone user is losing your smartphone. Lookout Mobile Security protects your iPhone like no one would ever could. Be it data loss, mobile theft or any other threat, Lookout Mobile Security backs you up in each of this case. It takes a regular backup of your phone automatically. In case you lose your phone, Lookout will locate it within seconds if it is connected to the internet. It also saves the last location of your iPhone before the battery drains out completely. It triggers an alarm to find your device if you feel it’s near by even if it’s in silent mode.

4. Norton Mobile Security:

Norton Mobile Security is known for delivering powerful, effective and a reliable protection for iPhone and iPad. It keeps tracing for any threat in your iPhone continuously and notifies you about the same. On top of it, Norton also makes sure that your data gets backed up regularly. Moreover, Norton Mobile Security can also find your iPhone if it gets lost. It saves the last location of iPhone before it is shut down and triggers an alarm to locate the same quickly. Hence, Norton stays a strong contender in this list of the best antivirus for iPhone in 2017.

5. Avira Mobile Security:

Avira Mobile Security is an ideal tool to have as an antivirus for iPhone in 2017 to ensure complete security. It keeps a track of your emails to make sure that their privacy has not been compromised. You also get a dashboard from where you can take control of your iPhone. With the help of Avira dashboard, you can connect to 5 devices which will be tracked and traced down in case of loss or theft. In-app, community support is also provided where you can post your questions and get answers quickly.

6. F-Secure Safe:

Most of the time that we spend on our iPhones involve the use of the internet. To make sure that your iPhone is all secured during your online activities is important. F-Secure Safe helps you keep your iPhone and your personal information safe while browsing. It notifies you about malicious nature of websites. Hence, maintains a healthy environment for you to explore the internet on. It also has an in built parental control feature which warns you before accessing any content which may be unsuitable for children. This can certainly prove to be the best antivirus for iPhone in 2017.

7. 360 Security

Over a long run use of iPhone, one is bound to collect a lot of pictures and data in the same. 360 degree is equipped with a photo optimizer which scans your album regularly for any duplicate photos. Also, it has the capability to group them according to it’s predetermined algorithms. 360 security also helps you clear out unwanted space from your iPhone. It cleans all the unnecessary files clearing up a lot of space from your iPhone. It also has features to save the battery of you iPhone.

Source

15 best antivirus Android apps and anti-malware Android apps


Antivirus Android apps remain one of the most popular types of applications on Android. Whether or not these apps are needed is a subject that has been debated ad nauseum. Generally, you don’t need one if you play it safe, only download apps from the Play Store, and keep your security settings enabled. However, there are those who like to take a walk on the wild side and not do those things. In any case, here are the best antivirus apps and anti-malware apps for Android.


VPN Express

Before you start thinking about antivirus software, the first line of defence in Android security is a solid VPN. One that users

256-bit encryptiondoesn’t keep logs and offers 24-hour Live Chat support.We recommendExpressVPN for Android. It’s $8.32 per month but you canget your money back within 30 days if you’re not completely satisfied.


360 Security best antivirus apps and anti-malware apps360 Security – Antivirus Boost

[Price: Free]
360 Security is one of the most popular and highly rated antivirus Android apps available right now with over 100 million downloads and 10 million ratings resulting in a 4.6 overall rating. That’s pretty good. This antivirus and anti-malware app comes with a ton of features, including the ability to scan your device files for malware, scan your apps and games, enable real-time protection, and even comes with an anti-theft feature. You can also use the app’s built in cleaner and booster service if you want, but the validity of those types of features aren’t particularly substantiated. Perhaps the most useful feature for this one is an app lock that lets you password protect any app on your device which is great for keeping nosy people away. The best part? It’s completely and totally free.


androhelm best antivirus Android apps and anti-malware Android appsAndroHelm Mobile Security

[Price: Free / $2.59/month / $23.17 per year / $99.65 or $119.85 for lifetime licenses]
AndroHelm’s Mobile Security app is a lesser known option that can still provide a bunch of benefits. The main functionality focuses solely on security with features that include real-time protection from malware and spyware. It also does scanning apps upon installation, frequent updates of the antivirus database, quarantine mode, app backups, virus protection, and a lot more. One of the more useful features include a set of functions that let you remotely block your device and delete stuff. The pricing structure is a bit complicated and the design could use an overhaul, but the functionality is solid and the app should work pretty well.
You can find all of AndroHelm Mobile Security’s pricing options by clicking here.

antivirus Android mobile security


Avira best antivirus apps and anti-malware appsAvira Antivirus Security

[Price: Free / $11.99 per year]
Avira Antivirus Security one of the relatively newer and lesser known antivirus apps but it’s quickly growing into one that people really seem to like. It comes with the basic stuff like device scanning, real-time protection, and even the ability to scan the external SD. It also includes modern features, like a Stagefright Advisor to help you work around that particular vulnerability. There is also some anti-theft feature, privacy features, blacklisting features, and device admin features. It’s a heavier antivirus app, but it doesn’t necessarily feel that way all the time. It’s worth a shot if for no other reason than to check out the Stagefright Adviser!


antivirus Android trustgoAntivirus and Mobile Security by TrustGo

[Price: Free]
Antivirus and Mobile Security by TrustGo is an app with a philosophy. The developers have talked about how they built the app from the ground up for mobile protection against mobile threats and this app does that. It has the basic features such as device scanning to look for existing threats, real-time protection, and a privacy guard that helps show you what apps are using which permissions (which, admittedly, won’t be nearly as awesome after Android 6.0). It does include secondary features such as a system manager, find-my-phone functionality, and data backup if you need it. It’s not quite as heavy as some of these competitors, but it is by no means a lightweight. It’s also 100% free to use. That makes it one of the really good antivirus apps for Android.

trustgo best antivirus and antimalware apps for android



Avast best antivirus apps and anti-malware appsAVAST Mobile Security

[Price: Free / $1.99/month / $14.99/year]
AVAST Mobile Security comes from Avast, a name that many people recognize from the antivirus market on PC. Avast on Android is just as well-known and trusted with over 100 million installs and just shy of four million reviews with a 4.5 overall rating in Google Play. The features include the usual device scanning, app scanning, and real-time protection but also includes consistent antivirus database updates, anti-theft features, and the ability to remote lock your device in case you lose it. AVAST is definitely one of the heavier antivirus Android apps that we’ve found and it comes with a metric ton of features that creates a pretty sturdy experience. If you go pro, you’ll get even more features including remote data recovery, remote SMS, geo-fencing, ad detection, and app locking. It’s one of the heavier antivirus apps. That makes it not a great option for those who need something light.


AVG antivirus androidAVG AntiVirus Security

[Price: Free / $3.99/month / $14.99/year]
AVG Antivirus Security is another antivirus Android app that many people know about from the PC antivirus space. As such, it has over 100 million downloads to date and a respectable 4.4 rating in the Play Store. AVG is a bit lighter of an option compared to other name-brand options and includes real-time protection, device scanning, and consistent antivirus database updates. On top of that, there is a task killer (which, admittedly, is pointless), anti-theft features, remote device data wiping, and you can monitor things like battery, storage, and data usage. The interface on this one is actually pretty good comparatively speaking and the paid subscribers can also get app locking, call and message blocking, and more.

Antivirus android security free by AVG


bitdefender antivirus androidBitdefender Antivirus Free

[Price: Free]
Bitdefender Antivirus Free is perhaps the lightest, most unobtrusive option on this list. It has exactly two features which is to scan and clean your device and then it offers real-time antivirus protection on top of that. The real-time protection scans apps as they are installed. It also keeps an eye on what apps are doing. The scanning is simple and only takes a few moments to get everything done. This is technically an offshoot of Bitdefender’s much larger antivirus suite, but we found that we loved that there is an option that requires zero configuration and runs as light as this one does. We prefer the light version of the heavy version but if you want to check out the heavy version, you can find it by clicking here.


CM security antivirus androidCM Security

[Price: Free]
CM Security had some viral success back when it was one of only a few free antivirus apps and was, at the time, the best free option available. It has some competition now, but CM Security is still pretty decent when it comes to antivirus and anti-malware protection as it has been ranked very high on AV-TEST repeatedly for several years now. On top of its antivirus and anti-malware features, CM Security also includes one of the better app locks that we’ve used (it even has fingerprint scanner support now) that not only locks your apps, but takes selfies of people trying to nose around in your business. It’s a lot more lightweight than some of its name brand competitors which is good and it’s completely free for everyone.


Dr Web best antivirus apps and anti-malware apps for androidDr Web Security Space

[Price: Free / $9.90 per year / $18.80 for 2 years / $75 for a lifetime license]
Dr Web’s Mobile Security suite is one that has come a long way since we first put this list three years ago. What started as a simple antivirus app has ballooned into one of the most comprehensive antivirus apps on mobile. It features two kinds of scans along with real time protection. The app also provides real-time protection for your external SD card. It also has anti-spam features, an ton of anti-theft features (including remote lock, custom remote messages, and remote wiping), a cloud checker, and even firewall support. It’s a highly powerful antivirus Android app that doesn’t come with a lot of clutter or bloat.



Eset best antivirus apps and anti-malware apps for androidEset Mobile Security and Antivirus

[Price: Free / $9.99/year]
Eset Mobile Security and Antivirus is from another popular name in the PC antivirus space (Nod32). It boasted an impressive 100% detection rate in 2015 with frequent updates to the antivirus database to try to maintain that in 2016. You’ll also get scanning and real-time protection as is the norm for these types of apps. It also comes with a tablet-specific interface which is rare. The free version is a little basic which is okay if you just need something simple to scan your device and provide protection. Paid subscribers get anti-theft features and more advanced security features if they choose. It’s one of the more trusted antivirus apps out there.


Kaspersky best antivirus apps and anti-malware appsKaspersky Internet Security

[Price: Free / $9.99 per year / $14.95 per year (license for two devices)]
Kaspersky is another very recognizable name in the antivirus space and their antivirus apps is intensely popular. Like others, it has a free version and a paid version with more features. The list of features includes scanning (free) for malware and viruses while the paid version gets real-time protection, anti-phishing, cloud protection, and anti-theft, as well as smaller features like sounding an alarm to help find your lost device. This one is quite heavy so those with older or lower range devices may feel the heat by using the full version of this one.


Lookout best antivirus apps and anti-malware appsLookout

[Price: Free / $2.99/month / $29.99/year]
Lookout is a natural option for many users because this antivirus app comes installed on many Android devices (particularly those on T-Mobile in the United States). Thankfully, the app isn’t half bad and manages to do its job quite well. The free version is a bit more comprehensive than most and includes antivirus, anti-malware, and anti-theft protection although the paid version gives more of all of those things. Paid subscribers also get anti-theft alerts, real-time web browsing protection, a privacy adviser, and some data backup features. It’s not a bad option and it’s even lighter than many other security suites. It’s not great that it’s pre-installed on devices. However, it works well enough to give it a fair shake.


Malwarebytes best antivirus apps and anti-malware apps for androidMalwarebytes Anti-Malware

[Price: Free]
Malwarebytes has an exceptionally good reputation for PC users thanks to its lightweight, no nonsense approach to finding and removing malware. The Android version isn’t much different. It had a bit of a rough start but has since rebounded with a respectable 4.2 rating and five million downloads to date. As we said, this one focuses primarily on antivirus, anti-malware, and anti-spyware so the main features are the device scanning and real-time protection. Otherwise, this is a simple app that manages to get out of the way and not use a ton of system resources. This is especially good for older devices, lower range devices, and for those who don’t want to see any hiccups while running an antivirus app.


McAfee Android antivirusMcAfee Security and Power Booster

[Price: Free / $2.99/month / $29.99/year]
McAfee is arguably one of the most recognizable antivirus apps out there. Thankfully, their app isn’t that bad. There isn’t much of a different between the free and pro versions. It comes down to just a few features. This is a great way to get a lot of protection for free although the paid version can get some pretty decent features as well. It includes features like phone support and backup services. McAfee added a “power booster” into the app which is unfortunate. Ignore that because it’s useless but the protection it offers is actually very good.


Norton Security best antivirus Android apps and anti-malware Android appsNorton Security and Antivirus

[Price: Free / $29.99/year]
Norton Security and Antivirus is from Norton which is another recognizable name in the antivirus apps space. Over the last year or two, Norton has undergone some positive changes. One of them was a more powerful free version of their antivirus app. Make no mistake, this is a “heavy” antivirus app but it seems to run better than it used to. You’ll get antivirus and anti-malware protection out of the box. Along with that, you get remote locking of your device, alarms to find missing devices, and some privacy features as well. The paid version gets far more features, but it’s nice to see Norton listening to constructive criticism.

Source

Do a winter cleaning through your mobile apps

Take a quick glance over your mobile apps, see what you have installed there.

  • Remove any apps you haven’t been using – they are vulnerabilities for your security and privacy.
  • Revoke permissions for apps that require access to sensitive information – why would a flashlight app request access to read your messages, for example?
  • Keep your apps update – this lowers the chances for malware to take advantage of their vulnerabilities.

And remember to never install apps from anywhere else but the official app store. In Android, there’s a setting that also doesn’t allow apps from third parties to be installed.

Enhance your smartphone’s security & privacy

Never leave your mobile phone unattended, without a security password in place. Activate your smartphone to auto lock the screen after a short period of inactivity, like 15 seconds.

4 digit PINs are the easiest to break, so you should skip using those and instead set a good password, similar to those you use for your online accounts. That means it’s long, random, with mixed lower and upper cases, digits and symbols.

Or draw a pattern.

Or, even better, activate fingerprint authentication, if that’s available on your device. It won’t be a secret, as we leave our fingerprints everywhere, but biometrics are the hardest to replicate.

Designing “Killer” Mobile Apps: A prototype story

Designing “Killer” Mobile Apps: A prototype story http://www.grapefruit.ro/ideas/designing-killer-mobile-apps-prototype-story/
By :Alecsandru Grigoriu

The event lasted two days: the first was packed with presentations (#web, #design, #mobile, #gaming, #performance, #opensource, #community, #art), while the second represented the workshop itself.

For this season’s edition, we decided to go on a different, funny and “wtf” approach: challenging ourselves just like the participants and design a mobile application for contracting “hitmen”. To keep it “legit”, there is no killing involved. Our dystopian vision involved only to taunt, steal intel and sabotage. We called it: HITS.

Mobile app logo design for the prototype application Hits.

The brainstorm

First of all we started laying down our ideas on paper. It didn’t matter if they were right or wrong, absurd or pure genius, we knew we are going to do something unique so we tried to fill in all the gaps.

Mobile app design ideas for the application Hits written on paper.

The flow

Of course we couldn’t have left the whole idea of the project just on paper full of scribbles and doodles. We centralized them and linked them in a more visually appealing way. We used simple shapes (rectangles, circles, squares) to pin point the main interactions and controls.

Mobile app flow with user experience interactions included.

The actual flow goes something like this: You enter your credentials, then validate your existence using a retina scan. Once you login you view the current missions you started. From here you can view the current progress (and location) of the Hitman (each mission has a list of milestones to be checked). Or you can start a new hit depending on what you want: taunt, steal intel or sabotage. After you select the type you view the list of hitmen available for the mission. After you choose the one you prefer, you are forwarded to a form where you send the offer. Here the negotiating part begins – you need to choose which budget, how “loud” the hit should be etc.

As a final touch thinking that this app needs a certain level of “intimacy” when you receive the final call from the contractor to confirm the hit… you get a masked message from “HunnyBunny” stating: “Dear, do you want some milk for tomorrow morning?” (Yes/No).

The sketches

Next up we detailed each screen on sketches. Here at Grapefruit we use gray markers, highlighters, thin liners and small black markers. We believe that the gray marker is a UX Designer’s best friend. We sketch a lot because it allows us to make mistakes and recover fast and most of all you don’t have to be artist extraordinaire.

Mobile app design sketches with colours and various details.

Testing the sketches

With the sketches drawn we went out and tested them internally. It may look naive, but it’s a very fast, efficient and cheap method to validate the layout, the controls, the interaction and behavior of our ideas.

Mobile app design sketches testing and proof of concept.

The visuals

Without further delays we started working in the visual language for the application. This included colors, fonts, controls, bars, buttons, animations, patterns and of course errors. We recommend to design even the worst case scenarios. For example, if a title is too long, will I trim it and add “…” at the end or will I organize it into two rows? The same goes for errors and how the user will recover from them.

Mobile app design style guide with colours, interactions, buttons, images and various icons.

The mockups validated with Skala Preview

The visuals helped us a lot to gain time and finalize the mockups. It was a matter of applying the visual style to the sketches. Moreover we used Skala Preview to get the designs synced on our devices to validate the whole layout. Every time we saved a PSD file, the screen updated itself on the device.

Mobile app design welcome screen and login page.
Mobile app design mission screen with details, map and tasks.
Mobile app design screen to setup the details for an assasin job with slide and button to complete the offer.
Mobile app design screen with assassin status and slide left menu.
Mobile app design notification screen with the final go of the assassination mission.

Testing the mockups

Once again, with the screens intact we printed and tested them internally. We wanted to make sure that the app looked, felt and behaved just like we need it.

Mobile app design mock-up with colors on paper and life size images for better interaction.

Updating the Flow

With the mockups finalized, we mapped the new screens and updated the flow. We used gesture icons to highlight and document the final behavior of the app.

Mobile app design flow with detailed interactions and color screens.

Prototyping

We didn’t stop here and we ran the app through several prototyping tools. Our first pick and one of our favorite and requiring options is Invision because of its simplicity and collaborative use. You can play with the prototype at invis.io/CN1LNB7P8

Mobile app design prototype in Invision. Interaction buttons and areas are highlighted.

We also experimented around with Marvel to test out their library of animations and transitions. It’s similar with Invision, but it lacks several key features – no collaboration on this one. You can check our prototype on marvl.in/2j9ghd

Mobile app design prototype in Marvel with transition and actions screen.

Our biggest surprise was Pixate. It allows you to add conditional complex animations. Think of Tinder shuffle cards or Path-like menus.

Its only downside stands in the lack of educational materials. Yes, there are some tutorials available, but sometimes you need more than a few videos if you want to grow a proper user base. Nonetheless… it’s cool. If you have Pixate installed on your phone… go check our demo at pixt.io/p5ail4oeqv8.

Mobile app design interactions using Pixate. Screenshot of screen while setting up an animation.

The Workshop

The first day of the event was a full-house fiesta of interesting and diverse presentations. It sparked the attention and curiosity of the participants and each talk managed to distinguished itself one from another.

The following day, the marathon started with the challenge to pick a random feeling (anger, happiness etc.) and design a concept that will make the user live that certain feeling. The contestants put a lot of effort into finding the right idea. Afterwards they started sketching on paper certain concepts and finally mixed them all into Photoshop mockups.

Surprisingly (in a good way) all those who wanted to present a working demo chose inVision as their main prototyping tools. Personally I was a bit disappointed that all of them went for a mobile application solution rather than thinking outside the box like wearables, projections, holograms etc. It would have been interesting to see such solutions. Maybe I’m just a bit pretentious. After all most of them were High Schoolers.

Conclusion

To conclude this experience, we had lots of fun being part of the event and we will continue to be involved in our local design/IT community.

Untrusted sources

There’s an app for that. But where does it come from?

Never, EVER install apps, on your computer, phone or tablet from untrusted sources.

If a website looks like this, navigate away immediately:

Make sure you have this turned OFF your Android phone or tablet:

 

And never tap “Install” on apps like these on your iPhone/iPad:

Rule of thumb: always use official websites and official app stores to download and install apps. Fake apps can pack malware, adware and other types of infections you do not want on your PC/tablet/phone.