Beware of the .exe extension

Cybercriminals will often try to prey on your inattention and carelessness. One of the simpler methods they use is by making the name of an executable malware seem like a different program.

For instance, they might name it something like: VID004.mpeg.exe or Job Position.docx.exe.

If you are in a rush and just glance over the first few words and then click it, you will accidentally execute the malware and infect your computer.

Dangerous File Extensions

The easiest way to identify whether a file is dangerous is by its file extension, which tells you the type of file it is. For example, a file with the .exe file extension is a Windows program and should not be opened. Many email services will block such attachments.

However, .exe isn’t the only type of dangerous file extension. Other potentially dangerous file extensions that can run code include: .msi, .bat, .com, .cmd, .hta, .scr, .pif, .reg, .js, .vbs, .wsf, .cpl, .jar and more. This is not an exhaustive list — there are many different file extensions in Windows that will run code on your computer when executed.

Office files with macros are also potentially dangerous. If an Office document extension ends with an m, it can — and probably does — contain macros. For example, .docx, .xlsx, and .pptx should be safe, while .docm, .xlsm, and .pptm can contain macros and can be harmful. Of course, some businesses use macro-enabled documents. You’ll have to exercise your own judgment.

In general, you should only open files with attachments that you know are safe. For example, .jpg and .png are image files and should be safe. .pdf, .docx, .xlsx, and .pptx are document files and should also be safe — although it’s important to have the latest security patches so malicious types of these files can’t infect you via security holes in Adobe Reader or Microsoft Office.

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